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Strategic Marketing Plan

November 30, 2021– I hope you’ve enjoyed the content this month which was tips for authors to promote themselves and their books. Be sure to visit tomorrow for a brand new theme of the month! Today, we’re talking all about strategic marketing plans:

Your strategic marketing plan shows how to market your book for success and serves as a roadmap of priorities and decision-making. Here are the questions that you need to answer for your plan. If you can’t answer these questions with a clear and concise vision, then you’re not ready to launch.

1) Does your plan align with the mission of why you do what you do? For example, let’s say you want to inspire young girls to grow up and be empowered to make good choices. Does your plan align with that message? These used to be called mission statements.
2) Does your plan assess the current environment and fit well within it? Are people reading more e-books? Are they reading paperbacks? What is the average price? What are they reading right now? Etc.
3) Does your plan identify a gap in the market? This is your point of differentiation. Publishing Made Simple came about because we got 15 phone calls in a week asking to answer questions about publishing.
4) Does your plan clarify strategic goals? What do you want your book to accomplish? How long will it take? How much will it cost?
5) Does your plan provide a logical pathway to reach the above goals? This is the ‘how’ you’ll do it.
6) Does your plan provide deadlines, objectives, and troubleshooting? What if the book doesn’t sell 5,000 copies in the first month? Etc.
7) Does your plan include a method for measuring and evaluating the success of the said plan? E.g., you set out to do a school visit four times a month, were you successful?

If you need help with your marketing plan as an author or publisher, you’ve come to the right place. Check out our offerings here: Virtual Courses, Classes, and Workshops – Pandamonium Publishing House or email us for a custom quote based on your needs pandapublishing8@gmail.com.

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Build Your Bloggers

November 15, 2021-I hope you’re enjoying this month’s theme, which is a daily tip a day for authors to promote themselves and their books! Today we’re talking about bloggers and why they matter to your success.

Reaching out to bloggers to recommend your books is an excellent idea for many reasons. Let’s explore:

  1. You cast a wider net. By finding bloggers to read and recommend your book or by guest blogging on their site, you reach a wider audience and perhaps an audience that wouldn’t usually be on your radar.
  2. You cross-promote. Bloggers are often interested in reciprocal marketing; if they have you on their site as a guest, usually they’ll ask to be a guest on your site as well. You can cross-promote yourselves and your products to allow more options for your readers on both sites. For example, if you write mysteries and they write thrillers, you can promote each other and your books. Be sure to research the bloggers you reach out to because you want your book to complement theirs and vice versa. You could even team up and offer your books as a package for your readers.
  3. You get reviews. Reviews are valuable to authors because they allow readers to have a glimpse into what people think of your book and what they like. Bloggers will often give an honest review of your book in exchange for a copy of it. Sometimes they will ask you to return the favour and review their book as well. By getting glowing reviews from well-known bloggers, you can use the reviews in your marketing; post the blogger review on your social media channels and be sure to tag them so that their followers see it and will potentially follow you after that! It helps to build your audience.

Don’t make the mistake that many people do who reach out to yours truly; I get at least an email a day asking to be a guest blogger on our site. I get pitched all kinds of things, like how to clean your house for less than a dollar a day, how to get rid of bees, and how to remove soap scum from the shower. None of these topics fit our blog, so why would I take the person up on their offer and have them guest post? Do your research before reaching out so that you have a better chance of hearing YES.

If you want more information on how to further your writing career, click here for a list of our current courses: Virtual Courses, Classes, and Workshops – Pandamonium Publishing House

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Media Madness

November 2, 2021– We’re finding our way around the theme this month, which is an idea a day to promote yourself and your work! This includes best practices and tips to help you navigate the waters of book promotion, advertising, marketing and publicity.

Today’s post is pretty straightforward when it comes to approaching the media. Do what the media likes and stay away from what they don’t like. Here are the likes:

  • News: Above all else, the media wants something newsworthy. News is what people talk about around the dinner table and with friends, family, and colleagues. The main goal of the media is FIRST to entertain, then to educate/sell.
  • Top 3: Money, sex, and health are what the media thinks the public is obsessed with. If you can link your books to any of these topics, they’ll be more likely to pick it up and publicize it because it increases the media appeal.
  • Conciseness: Why use eight words when four will do? Get to the point, make your press releases/info/emails short and sweet and never longer than a page.
  • Targeting: Just like writing, if your book is for everyone, it’s for no one. The same goes for the media. Research the audience you want to reach and target, target, target your approach for the best media outlet to pick up your story.
  • Relationships: Everything is about building relationships! Folks in the media build relationships, and they prefer to work with those around for the long term rather than one-hit wonders. Once you’ve made a connection, foster it with a long-term, mutually beneficial relationship.

Here are the dislikes:

  • Too long press releases: Get to the point and make sure you have a hook in your first sentence that piques the editor’s interest. Again, no more than one page! They don’t have the time or the inclination to read anything longer.
  • Links that don’t work: Let’s face it; everyone gets annoyed when they click on something, and the link doesn’t work, is broken, leads nowhere, or takes too long to load. What’s more, is that this looks highly unprofessional and is seen as a waste of time.
  • Misrepresentation: Don’t lie, exaggerate, or make things up just to fit your publicity narrative. Your article, idea, or release has to be relevant. Don’t fudge numbers or anything else (bestseller list, sales figures, who endorsed you etc.).
  • Name dropping: It’s not who you know, but who knows you! No, but seriously, don’t name-drop. It makes you look desperate and ridiculous. It’s fine to mention someone who previously wrote an article on your book if you’ve kept up the relationship; if not, don’t bother mentioning them.
  • No follow-up: The fortune is in the follow-up! So many people don’t get what they want because they don’t follow up and find out where their request is or if there have been any developments or progress on your ask.

Follow the tips above while reaching out to the people in the media to chat about your book! Here’s a list of our courses that you may be interested in: Virtual Courses, Classes, and Workshops – Pandamonium Publishing House