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Why Do We Write?

May 15, 2018- We are the dreamers, the drifters, the storytellers, and the ones with big ideas. We have imaginary friends and meaningful, midnight conversations with the voices in our heads. We create worlds and galaxies and tear down truths and rebuild lies. We are the storytellers.

Why do we do this? Why is it so important for us to tell stories? Because that’s what we were meant to do with our lives. We have an innate yearning to slip inside the eye of our minds and stay there. We have an obligation to tell the stories of our characters, and their screams and gentle whispers will not die until we validate their existence.

This is why I write anyways. My sole reason for putting pen to paper is because I can’t imagine doing anything else. When you find your purpose, there is a fire lit deep inside of you that is impossible to extinguish. If you try to put out the flames, you’ll start to feel incomplete or as if something in your life is missing. Trust me; I know this from experience. Do what you love and live your life the way you were meant to!

Fellow authors, why do YOU write? Let us know in the comments below.

Happy Writing,

LLB X

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Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling!

May 11, 2018- This is way too cool! Check out the 22 rules of storytelling by the experts at Pixar; are you following the rules or breaking them?

Pixar's 22 Rules for Storytelling: Challenge Your Characters. Come Up With Your Ending Before Doing Your Middle. #writing #writers #authors

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Books for Mental Health…

April 27, 2018-Here are some recommendations for books on mental health, I have personally read two of the books listed below and they were extremely helpful. These may also be useful for digging into research on your characters that may be struggling with the same issues!

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Writing Prompt…

April 6, 2018- I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE the writing prompt this week! It’s so creepy and interesting, and it’s given me a thousand different ideas for my own work. Let me know your thoughts in the comments below. Happy writing!

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How To…an Infographic

April 2, 2018-This is a really cool how-to infographic on creating epic characters. The info below is something that doesn’t need to be told to the reader, but rather, the writer should know these things about their character so that it will naturally bleed into their writing.  Pick bits and pieces that you want to share and leave the rest to the reader’s imagination. The more you know about your character, the better and more invested your readers will be!

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Writing Prompts-(This is going to be fun!)

December 1, 2017- I absolutely love coming across new writing prompts. Not only does it help writers sharpen their skills, but it also allows us to write about things that we may not normally write about. There are different types of writing prompts and here are a few examples below. Try a couple of these per day!

#WritingPrompt: Perhaps it is not a sad occasion for all present. www.writersrelief.comYou find a stack of Missing Persons news clippings under your parents' bed. All with your photo.:

Something about this image makes me feel uneasy

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Creating Characters-A Quick & Dirty Guide

November 25, 2017- Here’s a quick and dirty guide to creating characters. This is just a taste but feel free to contact me for more information about the classes I teach!

  • Without characters what is the point- Characters are the heart of your novel
  • What a character wants- It’s critical for the reader to know what your character wants from the start.
  • No one has to like me- The reader doesn’t have to like your character let’s get that straight but they MUST be able to give the reader a reason to follow him. To continue to read his story.
  • But they must care about what happens to him, they might want to see him dead but wishing him dead invokes strong feelings.
  • Tension creates awesome characters, it shows your reader what they’re made of. Put them into tense situations and see how they fare.
  • Choose your name wisely! Stay away from things like Skye and Storm…publishers are sick of seeing these names over and over.

Here is a basic character creating checklist:

  • Name, sex, right or left handed, age, height, build, eye colour, hair colour, distinguishing marks eg. Tattoos, scars, birthmarks etc.
  • Parents, siblings, marital status, significant others, children, other relevant relatives, pets, friends, enemies, other relationships eg. The person they buy lottery tickets from every single day etc. religion if applicable, beliefs and superstitions.
  • Occupation, status, wealthy or not, living space, mode of transport, workspace, are they a neat freak or are they messy
  • Fears, secrets, eating habits or food preferences, sleeping habits, hobbies, pet peeves, how they relax, attitudes, stressors, obsessions, addictions, ambitions, how are they seen by others and how are they seen by themselves

The bottom line is the more that you know about your characters the better. Of course, you don’t have to include everything on the checklist in your book but the point is to know your character so well that it comes through in your writing. Let a little of your character seep out at a time and be sure to show and not tell.

  • Make your character memorable but believable
  • What are the characters flaws? Arrogance, lust, greed, self-destruction, martyrdom, self-deprecation, martyrdom, stubbornness etc.
  • Don’t forget about facial expressions, body language, and emotions
  • Make sure you know your secondary/supporting characters, as well as you, know your protagonist
  • Remember that the secondary characters don’t know that they are secondary characters
  • Don’t let your characters have what they want
  • Ask yourself how you can make your character’s situation worse
  • Build flaws and conflict into the setting
  • Create conflict between characters (not only the protagonist and the antagonist but also between the characters who are friends and allies)
  • Increase the consequences of failure for the hero
  • Remember to blur the lines! The hero doesn’t know who to trust or the hero has clashes with the law, the hero hurts those closest to him, society turns on the hero.
  • Do terrible things to your character. Make them suffer a horrible loss or maim them if necessary.
  • Creating characters is the most important thing you do. If you get it wrong your story will be wrong no matter how well plotted.
  • These are the characters that you need to STOP writing! The hunky, brooding, and mysterious guy: mystery does not mean substance. The Mary Sue: the perfect main character who always gets everything right but doesn’t see it, everyone loves her and she can do no wrong. The popular girl: she’s mean and hates the protagonist for no reason. The nerdy sidekick: make sure their existence means something or kill them.
  • Make sure your character is always acting in character. Don’t make them do something that they wouldn’t normally do. Eg. Your character never combs his hair because he’s bald. Make sure you don’t put him in a bathroom with a comb, brushing his hair.
  • Give every character a reason to be in the story, if there is no reason for them to be in the story then kill them off.

Hope you enjoyed a tiny piece of character creation! Now get writing:)

X LLB

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