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Do You See What I See?

April 29, 2020-We’ve all seen those photos online that look like inkblots, and the question is always, “What do you see?” Of course, it’s all about perception. One person may look at the image and see a spider where another may look at it and see an angel. The point is perspective is essential, especially for authors.

Around here, we do our best to ensure that when we write, it’s from a different point of view. Let me explain; in my upcoming book King Midas, I tell the story from the perspective of King Midas’ barber. Why do I do that? Because in my opinion, it’s more interesting. The fable of King Midas has been told a thousand times before with a few differences here and there, but usually not many. I wanted to put a different spin on things and put my readers in a place where perhaps a well-known story is totally different than we thought it was.

One of the things that inspired me to write a different take on stories was something called twisted tales. A great example of this is an audiobook titled, As Old As Time, and it’s based on Beauty and the Beast. But instead of rehashing the same old story, the author decided to mix it up a bit. The premise is that Belle and the Beast are living happily ever after in the castle when one day, they find out that it was Belle’s mother who cursed the Beast. Wow! Talk about a totally different spin on a classic story that opens an entirely new can of worms! Writing from a different perspective can open up your writing and give you infinite new possibilities for your work. Here are some more examples to get your creativity flowing:

  • The Wizard of Oz-What if they had written from a perspective of Dorothy’s ruby slippers and how they saw the world through their own “eyes.”
  • Aladdin-What does the magic carpet have to say about the adventure, or how does Rajah the tiger see the events unfold?
  • The Jungle Book-What about the villain Shere Khan? How did he become a villain? Why does he see the world the way he does, and was he always that way? What events unfolded in his life made him so jaded?

You get the point. Every time you sit down to write, it’s crucial to choose a perspective that will entertain and allow your audience to see the world in a little bit of a different way. This helps open up the minds and hearts of your readers. Happy Writing, X LLB

 

 

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Your Scene Sucks…Here’s How To Fix It…

October 23, 2019– We’ve all been there.  Pen to paper or fingers to keyboard, we’ve all written scenes that don’t work;  they’re boring and bland and we sit staring into the abyss wondering where we went wrong. The good news is that we can fix it! Here’s how…by using our five senses.

  1. Sight-What is around your character? What do they see from their point of view? Are there landmarks? Describe in detail what your character sees. It’s better to write too much and pare down afterward, than it is to write too little.
  2. Sound-What does your character hear? Is there dialogue? Is more dialogue needed? Do they hear their own thoughts? Is there internal dialogue between the character in their head?
  3. Smell-What does your character smell? Is there the scent of salty ocean air? Fresh baked cookies? Rotting flesh? That escalated quickly, but you get my point.
  4. Taste-What does your character taste? Blood from biting their tongue? Vomit? Coffee? The taste of someone else?
  5. Touch-What does your character feel? Do they feel the softness of cashmere against their skin? Do they feel the brush of another character’s hand against their own? Do they feel cold metal against their temple?

Here’s the thing, it’s important to write and get the words on paper before you can even think of editing them. When you do find a scene that needs a bit of meat on it or that is boring, use your five senses to expand the part and then edit from there. Happy Writing! X LLB

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Publisher’s Corner…

May 10, 2019– On this episode of Publisher’s Corner, I answer a question from someone who is struggling with outlining. Ahhh, outlining is an old friend who I don’t particularly like to be honest. I’ll explain why in my answer below, so let’s dig in!

Q: “Lacey, Outlining is something that I’ve struggled with in the past. Which method do you tend to prefer?”  

A: This is an excellent question and I’ll be real and say that EVERYONE struggles with outlining! Why? Because some information out there is so damn complicated without needing to be. I agree that outlining is difficult because it’s often a case of not knowing how to organize your thoughts as an author. Organized thoughts and author in the same sentence? I know, eh? Crazy. There are a few different methods to outlining, but you have to discover which is best for you as a writer. I prefer the Get-it-all-out-and-sew-it-together method, which is kind of like putting pieces of a puzzle in place. You choose whatever is best for you! 

See you next Friday, Happy Writing! X LLB