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Conflicting Accounts

April 15, 2021– We’re halfway through the month, and we’re focusing on pushing the envelope in our writing. We hope that you have enjoyed the information so far! Today we’re going to focus on conflict, and no matter which genre you write in, whether it’s kids, historical fiction, sci-fi, or everything in between, your story needs conflict!

Person vs. Person is pretty typical and is what most stories focus on—person vs. person is one against the other, good vs. evil, the good guy always wins, there are a protagonist and an antagonist. But let’s explore something far more interesting that can help you push the envelope in your writing by talking about the three most boundary-pushing types of conflicts there are:

  1. Person vs. Society-Struggles between individuals and social codes in their world. There is a conflict between what a character desires and what society demands or expects. This could be where a character doesn’t quite fit into societal norms and finds themselves on the fringes or rebelling against society in general. For example, in a historical fiction book, society could dictate that women should be seen and not heard, not have children out of wedlock, and wear dresses, but your main character goes against that, stands up for herself and what she believes in, and bucks the norm. For an excellent read that showcases Person vs. Society, click here: Duty’s Daughter – Pandamonium Publishing House
  2. Person vs. Supernatural-Conflicts between characters and otherworldly events, entities, or paranormals. Conflict occurs when a character faces resistance from a supernatural force such as magical forces, otherworldly beings, deities, or unexplained energies. Many Hollywood blockbusters touch on this type of conflict (a la Stephen King, IT and pretty much everything he’s written).  A great example of this type of writing and story is available here: Once Upon a Vision – Pandamonium Publishing House
  3. Person vs. Technology-Conflict between characters and scientific discovery. In this type of conflict, the character is usually faced with a battle against technology that has become too powerful, too invasive, or is being used by another force for evil. A fabulous take on this type of conflict can be found here: Machinia – Pandamonium Publishing House

Now that you know there are ways to change the conflict in your writing to push the envelope, what are you waiting for? Get to work! Check out our entire collection here including books, courses, and services: Products – Pandamonium Publishing House

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Fight Me

April 13, 2020– We know that every story must have conflict and resolution, but did you know that there are six different types of story conflict? Let’s explore:

  1. Person vs. Person– This is the most common type of conflict in novels. It is the protagonist vs. antagonist (hero vs. villain). A good example of this type of conflict is…well…take any Disney movie; Gaston vs. the Beast, Ariel vs. Ursula, Mulan vs. the Huns and so on. There are too many examples to list of this kind of conflict!
  2. Person vs. Nature– This means conflict between characters and environment such as natural disasters etc. Some perfect examples of this type of conflict are the books/movies Twister or Dante’s Peak.
  3. Person vs. Self- I like to think that my novel Becoming James Cass (coming soon from Pandamonium Publishing House) is an excellent example of the conflict between the main character and himself. He’s always struggling to fight off his demons and has a ton of inner-conflict and self-destructiveness.
  4. Person vs. SocietyThe Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood is an excellent example of this type of conflict. Struggles between individuals and the social codes in their world are what this type of conflict is all about.
  5. Person vs. Supernatural– We’re talking about pretty much any book by Stephen King. Pet Sematary is one of my favourites, but so is It…these are excellent examples of conflict between characters and the supernatural/paranormal world.
  6. Person vs. TechnologyMachinia by Paul Moscarella (coming October 2020 from Pandamonium Publishing House) is an example of Protagonist vs. Technology. This is the conflict between character vs. scientific discovery. Also see, Terminator and Robocop for some other great examples.

What type of conflict does your novel have? Happy writing, X LLB