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Encourage Adventure

February 11, 2021– As we continue to explore Breaking out of our comfort zones this month, we’ve got a great Ted Talk to share with you! Meet Caroline Paul, Firefighter, Paraglider, and all-around adventurer. Gutsy girls skateboard, climb trees, clamber around, fall down, scrape their knees, get right back up — and grow up to be brave women. Learn how to spark a little productive risk-taking and raise confident girls. Be brave, be confident, and be adventurous!

 

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A Special Greeting!

January 15, 2021-Today we have our very own Paul A. Moscarella joining us with a personalized greeting for our Pandamonium Publishing House International Book Club! This month we are reading his debut novel, Machinia. Join us every Friday morning at 11 am on Facebook Live as we chat about his new science fiction book. http://www.pandamoniumpublishing.com/product/machinia

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Overdue

December 4, 2020-Libraries have the power to create a better world; they connect communities, promote literacy and spark lifelong learners. But there’s one thing that keeps people away: the fear of overdue book fines. In this thought-provoking talk, librarian Dawn Wacek makes the case that fines don’t actually do what we think they do. What if your library just … stopped asking for them altogether? Click here to watch this TedTalk: https://www.ted.com/talks/dawn_wacek_a_librarian_s_case_against_overdue_book_fines?utm_campaign=tedspread&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=tedcomshare

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Secret

November 30, 2020-You’re in a movie theatre, watching the new horror flick. The audience knows something that the main character does not. The audience sees the character’s actions are not in his best interest. What’s that feeling — the one that makes you want to shout at the screen? Christopher Warner identifies this storytelling device as dramatic irony. Directed by Ben Pearce, narrated by Christopher Warner. Let’s watch the Ted-Ed below:  Christopher Warner: In on a secret? That’s dramatic irony | TED Talk

 

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After 40

November 26, 2020-In this interview, bestselling novelist Lee Child (Jack Reacher novels) explains why it’s better to start writing later in life. Writers on Writing: Lee Child on Starting Writing After 40 – YouTube

 

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Fact vs. Fiction

November 16, 2020-Reading and stories can be an escape from real life, a window into another world — but have you ever considered how new fictional experiences might change your perspective on real, everyday life? From Pride and Prejudice to Harry Potter, learn how popular fiction can spark public dialogue and shape culture. Lesson by Jessica Wise, narration by Emilie Soffe, animation by Augenblick Studios. Check out this video below!

 

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Anti-Social

August 17, 2020-You need social skills to have a conversation in real life — but they’re quite different from the skills you need to write good dialogue. Educator Nadia Kalman suggests a few “anti-social skills,” like eavesdropping and muttering to yourself, that can help you write an effective dialogue for your next story. Directed by Joyce Stenneke, narrated by Rose Eveleth. Check out the TEDEd below:

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3 Things

July 29, 2020- We’re creating new content for our YouTube channel that will be posted soon, but for now, let’s hear about three simple things you can do to market your self-published book. Subscribe to our channel Pandamonium Publishing House for book trailers, upcoming events, tips for authors, and more!

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Grandpa’s Gift

July 24, 2020Have you read The Old Farmer’s Treasure? Well, I’ve got exciting news; Grandpa’s Gift is the sequel to The Old Farmer’s Treasure and will wrap up the story with one final clue. The boys are now grown, and they’ve got to risk it all to find the truth. Will they work together or will they be torn apart by the choices they must make? Coming December 2020, from Pandamonium Publishing House!

Watch the trailer for Book 1, here and remember to subscribe to our channel: 

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Putting the Pieces Together

July 17, 2020– She’s one of our own and we love her to bits! You know her as the author of Pants and Unfrogged, Tamara Botting; she’ll have two more books coming in 2021, so be sure to look for them in stores, on Amazon, and on our site. I’m thrilled to have her guest blog for us today!

I’ve had a longstanding love of Disney’s animated masterpiece, Beauty and the Beast. I wore out my first VHS copy of the film (yes, I’m that old and yes, it can be done). I bought the DVD as a teen, then bought the DVD again a few years later when the special collector’s edition came out. (So far, I’ve resisted the siren’s call of the Blu-ray). To this day, I can quote the opening of the film verbatim.

So, when I found a 1,000 piece Beauty and the Beast-themed puzzle, I decided to splurge a bit. (Hey, it’s not like I was going out, so why not bring a little entertainment home?) The thing is, as much as I like the idea of puzzles, I’ve only worked on a few over the years, mostly when I’m at a friend’s house, and they have one in progress.

Now that I’m working on one all on my own, I realize it’s a much bigger task than I’d anticipated. There’s a lot to work with, and a lot of pieces to try and fit together. And sometimes it takes a really long time to realize that what you thought was part of Belle’s dress is actually Beast’s waistcoat.

In a way, working on a puzzle is sort of like working on a book. Sometimes you find it’s easier to work on the framing; other times, you find yourself diving right into the middle of it. Sometimes the piece you thought should go in one place actually belongs in an entirely different spot.

It can be really easy to get discouraged when you have part of it coming together in one spot, part of it coming together in another, and for the life of you, you can’t figure out how those two parts come together.

But if you keep picking away at it, keep coming back to it, and keep on just telling yourself that you’re going to stick with this and get it done, eventually the parts will fit together. The bits that seem to have no home prove to actually be really important parts of the whole picture.

And once you have it all put together, you get to enjoy not only the completed project, but also the fact that your table is now clear, and you have room to work on a whole new project.

Because let’s be honest – whether writing or puzzles, it’s pretty hard to stop at just one.

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