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It’s Our Birthday!

🎉HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO US!!!!🎉Pandamonium Publishing House 50% off all of our courses one day only (October 1st) to celebrate our 6 years in business! Email 🖤🐼pandapublishing8@gmail.com for your 50% off coupon code! Can be used anytime and makes a great gift!

Check out our courses here: http://www.pandamoniumpublishing.com/shop

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The Cons of Self-Publishing

August 18, 2021- Yesterday, we spoke about the pros of self-publishing; we can call this part two to discuss the cons of the same subject. The more educated authors are about the publishing industry, the options, and expectations, the better chance they have of being published or at least choosing the best fit for their work.

  1. Initial and ongoing investment. Self-publishing can cost anywhere from $5,000 to $10,000+, and there are ongoing expenses. If you don’t have the funds to invest in an editor, formatted, designer, and publication, it’s going to be a tough road, and you’ll get a less than good product. The point is, most people can spot a poorly done self-published book a mile away based on the cover alone; then they pick it up and can see from the interior that it’s sub-standard. They’ll keep their money and spend it on a book that looks the way that it should, no matter how compelling the story.
  2. Too many hats. You are the person in charge of everything, as mentioned in the post before this one. You’ll be the one answering emails, interviewing graphic artists/illustrators; you’re the marketing and sales team as well as the social media guru. You’re the shipper, receiver, inventory orderer and fulfiller, and the person responsible for maintaining your website. There are at least fifty jobs that you’re responsible for while self-publishing. You could hire some personnel to help you, but most of the time, there’s not enough money left in the budget, so you end up doing everything yourself. This is not only time-consuming but counterproductive. Don’t be a jack of all trades master of none.
  3. People. You’ll need contacts for bookstore signings, graphic artists, illustrators, formatters, a printer, and an editor. You’ll need a group of beta readers, people who will give you honest reviews, and the right distributor. You’ll need an accountant, social media specialist, marketing manager and more. The list is long; be prepared to have a ton of doors slammed in your face before ever getting in front of your target audience.

I don’t say any of this to discourage you, but to be truthful that YOU must be the right type of person to take the rejection that comes with self-publishing. It’s not for the faint of heart or the easily rattled.

Here’s how we can help you on your self-publishing journey: http://www.pandamoniumpublishing.com/shop; check out the classes and services that we offer.

 

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Pros of Self-Publishing

August 17, 2021– During August, we’re talking about what publishers want! We want you to be informed and educated about the publishing industry so that you can make the best choice for your work. Today, we’re talking about the Pros of Self-Publishing; all the good stuff makes this publishing option very attractive to the right person. But, more on that later, let’s sink our teeth into today’s subject:

  1. Creative control. The author is in control of the project from beginning to end; cover design, editing process and changes to the manuscript, the size, page count, layout, formatting, inventory, sales, distribution, price point, and marketing are just some of the things that the author is fully responsible for.
  2. Higher royalty rate. When authors choose to self-publish, they get to keep more money. There is an initial investment on their part to get the book to market, but after costs, the profit is all theirs! Once they get enough sales under their belt to cover the initial investment, the rest is profit in their pocket. Plus, there are additional ways to make money as a self-published author, such as school visits, speaking fees, and lectures, for example.
  3. Continuing ed. Authors should be mindful of furthering their careers and take as many continuing education classes as they can afford. Writing is something that needs to be continually improved upon, and the publishing industry is constantly changing. It’s best to keep up with what’s going on in the market and what it demands. As a self-published author, one can decide where they would like to study as most writing continuing education classes are held abroad. I’ve been fortunate to travel globally to hone my craft of publishing and writing, and the benefits have been incredible. Not only have I been able to see and study new places, but I have build friendships that have lasted a lifetime just from attending writing conferences abroad.

With every good thing, there is always an opposite. Stay tuned for tomorrow’s post on the Cons of Self-Publishing.

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Cons of Traditional Publishing

August 16, 2021- As we continue our theme this month of what publishers want, we’re touching on the cons of traditional publishing. Last week we spoke about the pros of traditional publishing, so let’s explore the alternative.

  1. You have no control. The publisher is in total control of your manuscript and your book. They choose the parts they want to cut or extend, hire the cover designer and ensure that the book looks the way it needs to whether you like the cover art or not. Publishers turn the manuscript into something saleable because publishing is a business and your book is a product.
  2. Expectations are high. The industry is changing and has been for a while. Publishers now rely on authors to pull their weight. Not only do they expect authors to engage with their readers at book signings and events, they ask them to be active on social media and have an author platform in place before the book is published.  Authors are also expected to promote their books on various platforms. There are minimum sales targets for reprints, and if the book doesn’t reach that minimum, it will not get another print run.
  3. No guarantees. Authors might not get a reprint of their current book or another publishing deal, even if published in the past. Things change all the time, and new authors and ideas come into play. There are no guarantees in publishing or life.

The point is to treat each book as if it were your first; put the work in, be active in the promotion and sale of your book, and keep writing!

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Pros of Traditional Publishing

August 13, 2021- We’re talking about what publishers want during August, and today I thought it might be good to talk about the pros of traditional publishing. Why an author would consider traditional publishing as an option, and on Monday, we’ll chat about the cons. Let’s dive in:

  1. You get paid for your work. This is every aspiring author’s dream, to be paid for their work! After years of struggling, you’ve finally made it! In traditional publishing, the publisher purchases your work and pays you an advance or royalty. All you have to do is write the book and complete the revisions that the editor expects. Plus, you will receive a royalty on your book for the life of the work.
  2. Everything is handled. From your marketing plan to publicity, book signings,  and bringing your book to market, the publisher takes care of it all. They tell you where to be and when. They take care of you and your book from beginning to end. Publishers also handle the sales, payments, earnings reports, and inventory, as well as editing design, formatting, and creation of your book.
  3. Opportunity. Publishers have a vast network of contacts, and from those contacts comes opportunity. Your book and your face have the potential to be in front of a ton of people and media personnel. You’ll have opportunities that most people can only dream of!
    Authors can be found in documentaries (like ours!): https://drive.google.com/file/d/14HpvaRHvxk1T4J4NbRdvXwRQ3VpkAZOs/view?usp=sharing
    in newspapers, on radio segments and podcasts, on blogs worldwide, interviewed on internet segments, YouTube Channels, and red carpets.

There are many pros when it comes to traditional publishing, and publishers want to see that you are informed about how the various types of publishing work. Know what you’re getting into. Happy Weekend, everybody! See you on Monday to talk about the cons of self-publishing.

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Publishers and Positivity

August 4, 2021– Yesterday we talked about the importance of authors having a clean social media profile because they are an extension of and representative of the publisher and the House. Today, we’ll focus on the importance of positivity and why it matters to publishers.

During normal pre-pandemic times, I met every author that I was interested in publishing, face to face at a coffee shop or for lunch. Now, I meet them via Zoom, Facetime, or at the very least, over the phone. Why? Because I like to know who I’m working with and if we’re a good fit for them as their publisher and if we’re a good fit for them as an author. I like to know if we mesh, if we share any of the same values, and to get a glimpse into their personality.

To be honest, not a lot of publishers do this and 99 percent of them never meet the author! Because we’re a small House, I think it’s especially important to personally meet every individual on my team because we work so closely together and there’s a ton of communication between all of us. I especially love it when authors are energetic, enthusiastic, and upbeat! Here’s why positivity matters to publishers:

  1. Happier-We want our authors to be happy as they interact with the public and readers; we love authors who have a positive mindset because they’re naturally charismatic and wonderful to be around. Happy authors inspire new and upcoming writers/authors, and for publishers, that is our mission.
  2. Healthier-Authors who are optimistic are healthier in terms of their outlook on the world, taking on responsibilities, and having a strong work ethic. We know that book signing tour schedules can be gruelling and can take a toll mentally and physically, so positivity is very important in that regard as well. Everyone knows that happiness is contagious.
  3. Wealthier-Happy authors make more sales and that means more money for them! As publishers, we pay a royalty to the author on every book; the more sales, the higher the royalty. Happy authors are wealthier not only in their pocketbooks but also in the opportunities they get and the relationships they forge.

Positivity is important and publishers can’t wait to work with authors who are cheerful, lively, and pleasant. It makes our jobs better, our team brighter, and our readers smile.

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August Theme=What Publishers Want

August 2, 2021– We’re starting a new theme this month, and it’s all about what publishers want! We’re going to go through things like queries, synopsis’, frequently asked questions (the questions that we get asked the most), how to find the right publisher for your genre, submission requirements, and more! We’ve got a lot to cover, so let’s start with one thing at a time; today, we’ll be focusing on how to find a publisher for your specific genre.

This can seem like a daunting task, and often, authors have no idea where to start. Let’s say that you’ve finished your manuscript and you’re looking for a publisher for your cozy romance novel, here’s what to do in a certain order.

  1. Do what no one else does. What is it? Read the copyright page to see who published your favourite novel. No one cares about the publisher; they care about the author, that is until the author is ready to have their book published! So, if you’ve got a/some captivating new cozy/cozies that you’re reading, flip to the front page and see who published it. Their contact information will be there, and you can find them online.
  2. Go online. Go to the publisher’s website for two reasons: 1) To find out if they’re accepting submissions. 2) To find the submission guidelines.  You’ll be able to answer a bunch of questions just by visiting their site. Do NOT submit unsolicited manuscripts if the publisher does not accept them, and be sure to follow the guidelines to the letter, because if you don’t, your manuscript will end up in the recycling folder and will never see the light of day.
  3. Read the Bible. No, not the actual bible, but the Writer’s Market 2020 Guide, which I consider the author’s bible. Inside this gem of a book, you’ll find all of the publishers across Canada and the US, who publishes what, and who and how to contact them. It’s an essential tool that can be used to start your search. I’ve bought every edition since 2015 and have been adding them to my personal library ever since. There is also tons of valuable information via agent interviews, author takes, and publisher advice.

We’ve got a lot to cover in August! Subscribe to our blog for new content five days a week; you don’t want to miss a thing! To check out my book, Advice from a Publisher, click on the link below:

https://www.amazon.ca/Advice-Publisher-Insider-Getting-Published/dp/1989506143/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=advice+from+a+publisher&qid=1627919801&sr=8-1

 

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Marketing Yourself as a Public Speaker

July 29, 2021-Tomorrow we officially wrap up our month-long theme of Public Speaking for Authors! Let’s dive into our subject today which is tips for marketing your author self as a public speaker. Here are 3 things to help:

1) Video-If you’re trying to get public speaking gigs to talk about your new book for example, you can send out an email linking the prospect to a video sample of you speaking or to your YouTube channel that has relevant content such as you giving a presentation, lecture, talk, author interview etc.

2) Podcast-Your podcast is an extension of your ability to speak clearly, enthusiastically, and professionally while showcasing your knowledge and expertise. Linking to your podcast for those interested in hiring you gives them a sample of your skills.

3) Facebook/Instagram live-Authors often use Facebook and Instagram live to chat about different things in a conversational tone while interacting with their audience. Use this to your advantage and link your social media samples for your prospect to see. It’s also a great way to show them that you’re relaxed, can think on the fly, and that you can answer questions from your viewers with ease and confidence.

Public speaking for authors can open new doors and opportunities for you to share your work and your skills!

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Speech Writing (Part 2) The Mechanics

July 14, 2021-Yesterday we talked about best practices when preparing for your speaking engagement and the overall attitude you should have when publicly speaking. Today we’re focusing on the mechanics of speech writing. Let’s get started!

To write an engaging, informative, and interesting speech, here are 5 tips to help you:

  1. Clear, relevant message. What do you want your audience to take home from your speech? What action do you want them to take? What do you want to teach them? What should they remember? The clearer you are about these points, the more relevant and targeted your message is, the more valuable your talk is to your audience.
  2. Outline. Just like writing a book, a speech is no different. You must begin with an outline to keep you organized and allow you to make your point effectively. Your speech should have an introduction, a middle, and an ending that includes a call to action such as purchasing your book, or signing up for your newsletter, or booking their spot at your next workshop.
  3. Storytelling. People remember stories when relaying and recalling information. Stories make a big, memorable impact when told properly and when details are remarkable, shocking, inspiring, or heartwarming. Make sure that the story in your speech is repeatable and sharable. Ask yourself if it’s buzzworthy! If not, leave it out.
  4. No PowerPoint. Powerpoint is dead. So are cue cards. Yep, it’s time that you memorized your speech, and when you get good enough at it and have practiced and given the speech several times, you won’t need to use anything as a crutch or distraction. The fact is, the more data, PowerPoint slides, and notes you use, the more amateurish you look to your audience. You look like less of an expert. Plus, slides and data are usually boring, and you want your speech to stand out and make a memorable impact.
  5. Keep it Simple. Don’t use eight words when four will do (please write this on my gravestone) and leave the complicated language out. When delivering your lecture, the more superfluous you are, the more disinclined your audience will be to acquiesce to your request of paying attention to your speech. See what I mean? Don’t use a word salad to make yourself seem intelligent; the only thing that does is make your audience disengage.

Here’s the formula: 

Interesting fact for your audience (did you know?) to immediately grab their attention—-jump into a story—-get to your main points—-wrap everything up with a bow—-call to action—answer audience questions—call to action again.

Write your speech and practice, practice, practice!

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Benefits of Public Speaking

July 12, 2021-I hope you’re enjoying our theme this month of public speaking for authors and that you’re learning a lot!

Today we’ll talk about 3 benefits of public speaking for authors, let’s dive in:

1) Career advancement-You never know who will be in your audience! Maybe there’s a new client, a new reader, or someone that can book you for a speaking engagement at their company. The possibilities are endless and overnight your career can advance if you put on an engaging, exciting, and interactive chat. Plus, public speaking is a great way to build credibility as an author and be seen as an expert in your field.

2) Boost Confidence-By doing the things that scare us the most (public speaking for 90% of people), our confidence grows. Public speaking is just the thing that can take authors out of their comfort zones and help them grow and flourish in their writing careers. We turn our weaknesses into strengths by pushing the limits of what we find uncomfortable and doing it despite the discomfort.

3) Better Writing-Preparing a speech or developing a presentation is no easy feat even though we are professional writers. We need to have a message, but we also need to tailor that message to meet the needs of our audience so that they get a ton of value from what we’re saying. By sitting down and working out the details of our speech, we become better writers who are more concise, fluid, and organized in our thoughts and what we need to accomplish.

You can open yourself up to a whole world of opportunity, by publicly speaking as an author, that can quite literally take you and your books around the globe. Tomorrow, we’ll talk about how to write a speech and best practices. Stay tuned!