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Great Expectations…For Yourself

November 8, 2019– There’s a little book on my desk by Dr. Denis Waitley titled, The Psychology of Winning. I haven’t opened it in such a long time that I had forgotten most of the concepts, so today I flipped open to a random page. The text on the page read, “Winners expect to win. They know that so-called luck is the intersection of preparation and awareness.” I’d like you to complete the following exercise, get a piece of paper and a pen or open your laptop and answer the following questions:

  1. How do you feel about the above statement?
  2. Are you prepared and aware of the opportunities around you?
  3. What are 5 things you can do to prepare for opportunities coming your way? What opportunities would you like to have this year?
  4. What expectations do you have for yourself and your work for the rest of this year? What about 2020 and beyond?
  5. Do you expect to win as an author or as a publisher? How do you expect to win?
  6. What does winning mean to you?

Wishing you the most success, X LLB

CD002026

 

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You’re About to get Lectured on Your Lecture…

January 14, 2019- As authors know, occasionally we must give lectures about our books or our work. Public speaking is something that we should be used to by now because we’ve been preparing speeches since we were kids. Public speaking doesn’t have to be scary and it doesn’t have to be scarier than death, (I’m not kidding when I say that people would rather choose death than to stand in front of a crowd and talk…seems crazy to me!) because here’s all you need to know to successfully speak in public.

  1. Prep your stuff. Chances are that you know what you’re talking about when you’re speaking on your profession or when talking about your book, but It’s always good to prepare in advance in case the butterflies make you lose your mind and forget everything you’ve ever known. A couple of index cards are great when giving a formal speech with some notes jotted down in point form, or when speaking about your book, practice what you’re going to say or read (like an excerpt from your work).
  2. Vocal power. Speak slowly, pause, breathe, and smile. The last thing you want to do is come across as incoherent. Remember that episode from Seinfeld with the low talker and the close talker? Don’t do either of these things. Speak slowly, clearly, and loud enough so that the audience at the back of the room can hear you. If you’re nervous about speaking in public already, the worst thing to happen is for someone to shout from the back of the room, “WE CAN’T HEAR YOU!” Cue red cheeks and sweat stains. Remain calm and speak with confidence and power.
  3. Listen. When the question period of your lecture comes, be sure to listen to what your readers/clients/associates are asking you. Pause a few seconds before you answer and never, ever interrupt when someone is asking you a question. Make your questioner feel good and avoid making negative associations. Don’t make them feel bad or wrong and watch your body language. You’ll have your fair share of dumb questions, but keep those feelings to yourself. We’ve all asked a dumb question at one time or another!

So, get out there and tell the world about what you do and what you’ve written! They deserve to know how awesome you are.
X LLB